National Pest Plant Accord (NPPA)

Introduction

The NPPA was established in 2001 as a memorandum of understanding between NGIA, DOC, MPI (then MAF) and the majority of regional councils.  Its purpose is to stop the spread of pest (weedy or potentially weedy) plants through the casual, nursery or retail trade where distribution through these trades is the plant’s primary distribution pathway.  

The NPPA is heralded by all parties as a model of industry working with the regulators to ensure proactive engagement and even-handed regulation.  The majority of decisions are made by consensus and pragmatism dominates. 

Plants on the NPPA list are prohibited from being sold.   For a plant to be so classified the NPPA Steering group (of which we are part) needs to be satisfied that banning the trading of a plant would limit the spread of species.  The Accord is not designed as the sole means of controlling weeds (contrary to some public perception) and is not intended for plants that are not sold through the trade – gorse for example.

The Accord list is reviewed every five years, the next review scheduled for 2017. If you need to know more, visit http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/nppa,

Please also note the NPPA is intended for plants of (near)-national concern, and most regional councils maintain a list of regional pest plants.  Their websites are the best place to go, and a Google search will also assist - for example "pest plants Canterbury".

13-Oct-2015

NPPA Steering Group meeting September 2016

30-Sep-2016
The National Pest Plant Accord (NPPA) Steering Group met in September and further developed its thinking on the Technical Advisory Group processes and decision tree as it considers submissions for plants to be added to the NPPA (no sale) list, how it manages legacy species which no longer meet the criteria of the Accord in advance of the 2017 NPPA plant list review.

NPPA descision deferred

27-Nov-2015

At it's meeting early in October the NPPA Steering Group determined that it was appropriate to defer its decision on the four species that required further research following the 2012 pest list review. These four species are:

  • Banksia integrifolia - Coast banksia
  • Cornus capitata - Strawberry dogwood
  • Jasminum polyanthum - Jasmine
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata - Sexton’s bride, Indian hawthorn, Yeddow hawthorn

The Steering Group felt that is still did not have sufficient information. In addition feedback following the 2012 review process highlighted the need to examine NPPA processes and procedures in advance of the 2017 species list review. Consideration of these four species would benefit from the improvements that would arise from the process examination, now scheduled for next year.

More details here.

 

NPPA Steering Group preparing for 2017 species list review

Posted 13 October 2015

The NPPA Steering group met early October and began discussions preparing for the 2017 review of the NPPA plant list. A meeting to shape the Steering Group’s approach is scheduled for late February. If you have matters for the group to consider, please let John Liddle know - john@nginz.co.nz

 

National Pest Plant Accord (NPPA) - species list review call for submissions

Posted April 2015

The 2012 NPPA pest list review flagged four species that warranted further research.

  • Banksia integrifolia - Coast banksia
  • Cornus capitata - Strawberry dogwood
  • Jasminum polyanthum - Jasmine
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata - Sexton’s bride, Indian hawthorn, Yeddow hawthorn

Early this year, the Steering Group determined that these species represent significant invasive risk and meet the criteria for adding to the NPPA list - meaning that they cannot be propagated or sold.

Prior to a final determination however, the Steering Group seeks feedback from industry, and interested parties are asked to send their views to the NPPA coordinator - nppa@mpi,govt.nz by 31 July 2015. An NPPA information sheet provides background to the decisions and these four species.

 

NPPA Species List Review - information needed

Posted November 2014

When the National Plant Pest Accord (NPPA) list was reviewed in 2012, the Steering Group (of which NGINZ is a member) flagged several species of concern, but for which it needed more information before a decision is made on whether to add these plants to the NPPA banned plant list.

A review of these four species was scheduled for 2014:

  • Banksia integrifolia
  • Cornus capitata
  • Jasminum polyanthum
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata

While later than expected, the process has begun, with MPI preparing risk assessments and the Technical Advisory Group is about to meet. The Steering Group is scheduled to meet on 26 November and public consultation will follow after that and through to early 2015.

If you grow any of the above species we need to hear from you. We need to know

  • How many and to what grade
  • Your sales value
  • Observations you have on
    • How weedy (or not ) they are
    • Whether you have observed them as “garden escapees”, and if so, where
    • Their presence or absence in the natural environment

If you have concerns about these plants, on whichever side of the argument you sit, please gather your thoughts, numbers (and evidence) and send them through to John Liddle by 20 November, john@nginz.co.nz

John Liddle, Malcolm Woolmore and Ian Duncalf represent industry on the NPPA Steering Group and welcome your feedback.

 

NPPA - Five species subject to further review

Posted November 2012

Plants Subject to 2014 NPPA Review
Several plant species considered for prohibition from sale in the 2012 NPPA List review were held over for review in 2014.
These are:

  • Banksia integrifolia
  • Cornus capitata
  • Jasminum polyanthum - Jasmine
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata

Another will be reviewed in 2021

  • Archontophoenix cunninghamii - bungalow palm

All drew considerable debate and the NPPA Steering group determined more work was need prior to making a decision.

However, we also agreed that industry should be informed of the possibility of these species be prohibited from sale from 2014 and 2021 as appropriate. An NPPA information sheet is available for download, and growers are advised to plan for a worst case scenario - that is, plan as though these plants will be banned from production and sale.

 

National Pest Plant Accord 2012 species list review outcome

Posted July 2012

The NPPA was established in 2001 as a memorandum of understanding between NGIA, DOC, MPI (then MAF) and the majority of regional councils. Its purpose is to stop the spread of pest (weedy or potentially weedy) plants through the casual, nursery or retail trade where distribution through these trades is the plant’s primary distribution pathway.

The NPPA is heralded by all parties as a model of industry working with the regulators to ensure proactive engagement and even-handed regulation. The majority of decisions are made by consensus and pragmatism dominates.

Nevertheless, some plants are real problems, and others represent emerging threats.

Plants on the NPPA list are prohibited from being sold. For a plant to be so classified the NPPA Steering group (of which we are part) needs to be satisfied that banning the trading of a plant would limit the spread of species. The Accord is not designed as the sole means of controlling weeds (contrary to some public perception) and is not intended for plants that are not sold through the trade - gorse for example.

The Accord list is reviewed every five years, and the results of the 2011/12 review were published in June. The following plants have been added to the list of those prohibited from sale:

  • Asparagus plumosus - asparagus fern
  • Carex pendula - drooping sedge, Otahuna sedge
  • Cestrum aurantiacum - orange cestrum
  • Cestrum elegans - red cestrum
  • Cestrum fasciculatum - red cestrum, early jessamine
  • Cestrum nocturnum - queen of the night
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum - clerodendrum
  • Juglans ailantifoli - Japanese walnut
  • Kennedia rubicunda - dusky coral pea, coral pea, running postman
  • Maytenus boaria - Maytenus chilensis, mayten
  • Passiflora apetala - bat-wing passion flower

The new NPPA booklet will be published in June. If you need to know more visit http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/nppa, and come to conference; Andrew Harrison former MPI chair of the NPPA Steering Group is speaking on the NPPA.

Please also note the NPPA is intended for plants of (near)-national concern, and most regional councils maintain a list of regional pest plants. Their websites are the best place to go, and a Google search will also assist - for example "pest plants Canterbury".

 

National Pest Plant Accord 2012 species list review open for submissions

Posted December 2011

The review “pest plant list” is now open for public submission. We emailed members details on 28 November 2011 and urge that you all consider the recommendations of the NPPA Steering Group.

There are plants that the Steering group have determined should be added to the list along with many that were nominated but the Group rejected for inclusion. We, NGIA, needs our members to review the plans, support those recommendations that you agree with or argue (with facts and figures, and details as to why a plant is or is not invasive) those you do not. In particular, there is list of plants that the Steering Group need more information during the consultation phase before a final decision is made. There are some commercially significant plants on this list.